THE GOLDEN GLOBE awards are so very different than so many other award shows, even if you don’t include Ricky Gervais. I’ve concluded that the Oscars would be much better if everyone had a special Oscar flash filled with an adult beverage of choice, alcoholic for all who can imbibe. The Golden Globes can be foreshadowing for Oscar.

But before Leonardo DiCaprio got his due and his globe this happened. (h/t ET)

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Previews for “The Revenant” are unlikely to inspire moviegoers, with the film being ambitious, and a challenge to your average moviegoer. The story is chilling. However, the film got a much-needed boost by winning best motion picture drama, director, and best actor for Leonardo DiCaprio, who certainly should have received an Oscar long before now. “Aviator” or any number of the roles he has played, especially “The Wolf of Wall Street,” portraying Jordan Belfort.

Alejandro González Iñárritu, who was the vision behind the film, couldn’t believe his good fortune. (Remember “Birdman”?)

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Jennifer Lawrence won for “Joy,” which happened after Amy Schumer, riding into the evening with nominations for “Trainwreck,” joined her friend on stage.

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Lawrence won, Schumer didn’t and neither cared.

“[I] expected Amy to win. This was truly surprising for me” – Jennifer Lawrence [Variety]

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Extraordinary that Aaron Sorkin won for best screenplay for “Steve Jobs,” which is wholly worthy but I’m stunned. The film bombed. The screenplay was brilliant. The character breakdown of a man who had become a myth was, at times, horrifying. that a person of genius could be so cruel. Kate Winslet also won a globe for the film for her portrayal of Joanna Hoffman.

Below is the best review of Sorkin, who made the story so riveting, in my opinion.

…Cleaving to this structure lets The West Wing writer do what he does best: write electric dialogue for actors walking up and down hallways. Each scene involves the problem of getting a product launch off the ground, with Jobs and his indefatigable right hand Joanna Hoffman (Kate Winslet) contending with venue logistics, malfunctioning hardware, and an inner circle that Jobs can’t help but alienate, all in the name of moving mankind forward.

Make no mistake: this is unquestionably a Sorkin film, featuring everything from the ping-ponging dialogue to the almost-romance between the male and female leads. The script flies along at a terrifically engaging pace, capturing the spirit of a tech launch — the high anxiety, the frayed nerves — beautifully, landing somewhere between The Social Network and Birdman. And under Boyle’s stylish direction, what might otherwise be a stage play turns into a visual tour de force, flitting from grainy 16mm in 1984 to theatrical 35mm and hyper-polished HD with each passing era. Keep in mind that the movie doesn’t concern itself too heavily with the factual particulars of the products being launched. (Probably ideal, since Isaacson got so much about Jobs’ actual work wrong.) Instead, the beauty of Steve Jobs is that it uses computers as catalysts, enabling Sorkin to bend Jobsian lore to his will and set off fireworks between his characters.

Is Brad Pitt actually getting younger?

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…and Rocky returns after 29 years!

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Ricky Gervais and… MEL GIBSON. #awkward

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