Congress Moves to Control Trump on Russia
photo by Louis Jacobson, Tampa Bay Times

THE VETO-PROOF legislation codifying and expanding sanctions against Russia infuriated President Trump.

Russia’s Prime Minister Medvedev threw shade.

There’s enough wiggle room in Trump’s statement — he hates being a supplicant to Congress — to render it virtually meaningless. He’s got the same PR problem as the Russians.

There are two bills in Congress to further hem Trump in where firing Special Counsel Robert Mueller is concerned.

Mueller has impaneled a Washington, D.C. grand jury, going beyond where this started with Michael Flynn.

Watch this space…

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 2, 2017

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT

Today, I have signed into law H.R. 3364, the “Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act.” While I favor tough measures to punish and deter aggressive and destabilizing behavior by Iran, North Korea, and Russia, this legislation is significantly flawed.

In its haste to pass this legislation, the Congress included a number of clearly unconstitutional provisions. For instance, although I share the policy views of sections 253 and 257, those provisions purport to displace the President’s exclusive constitutional authority to recognize foreign governments, including their territorial bounds, in conflict with the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Zivotofsky v. Kerry.

Additionally, section 216 seeks to grant the Congress the ability to change the law outside the constitutionally required process. The bill prescribes a review period that precludes the President from taking certain actions. Certain provisions in section 216, however, conflict with the Supreme Court’s decision in INS v. Chadha, because they purport to allow the Congress to extend the review period through procedures that do not satisfy the requirements for changing the law under Article I, section 7 of the Constitution. I nevertheless expect to honor the bill’s extended waiting periods to ensure that the Congress will have a full opportunity to avail itself of the bill’s review procedures.

Further, certain provisions, such as sections 254 and 257, purport to direct my subordinates in the executive branch to undertake certain diplomatic initiatives, in contravention of the President’s exclusive constitutional authority to determine the time, scope, and objectives of international negotiations. And other provisions, such as sections 104, 107, 222, 224, 227, 228, and 234, would require me to deny certain individuals entry into the United States, without an exception for the President’s responsibility to receive ambassadors under Article II, section 3 of the Constitution. My Administration will give careful and respectful consideration to the preferences expressed by the Congress in these various provisions and will implement them in a manner consistent with the President’s constitutional authority to conduct foreign relations.

Finally, my Administration particularly expects the Congress to refrain from using this flawed bill to hinder our important work with European allies to resolve the conflict in Ukraine, and from using it to hinder our efforts to address any unintended consequences it may have for American businesses, our friends, or our allies.

DONALD J. TRUMP

THE WHITE HOUSE,
August 2, 2017.