Bill Clinton in Town and Country

Bill Clinton in Town and Country makes it plain that 2016 won’t be anything like 2008.
Photo via Town and Country, public domain: BILL CLINTON INSPECTING THE CHOLERA TREATMENT CENTER WITH SEAN PENN.

Whatever occurs, Clinton’s priority is to keep the foundation alive, “whether I’m running it or not. I’ve told Hillary that I don’t think I’m good [at campaigning] anymore because I’m not mad at anybody. I’m a grandfather, and I got to see my grand daughter last night, and I can’t be mad.”

[Town and Country]

THE COVER of the May issue of the ultra elite magazine Town and Country, the focus of which is their annual philanthropy issue, starring William Jefferson Clinton, will certainly get tongues wagging. It already is. When the issue hits full circulation stride, Hillary Rodham Clinton will have announced her run for the presidency.

The article gives the history of President Bill Clinton and the sad, little country of Haiti. A long, alarmingly slow, mostly depressing, but important tale about the efforts required to bring a country back from ruin.

Then there’s the political pay off for everyone looking for a sign of what is role will be in 2016.

Clinton is aware that the world at this very moment may be slightly more interested in the political plans of his wife than in his foundation, and he is willing to play a game of If She Does Run. (At press time Hillary Clinton had not announced her decision.) “I think it’s important, and Hillary does too, that she go out there as if she’s never run for anything before and establish her connection with the voters,” he says. “And that my role should primarily be as a backstage adviser to her until we get much, much closer to the election. So our plan is to spend this whole year working on the foundation, which is, by a good long stretch, the most transparent of all the presidential foundations and more transparent than a lot of other major foundations in the country. It should be, both because I believe in it and because Hillary is in public life, and we’ll get criticized, as some people are criticizing me, for taking money from a foreign government. We did a review of the whole foundation last year.” Clinton is emphatic about this and intent on my noting it. “We got suggestions from a great law firm that also does pro bono counsel for Doctors Without Borders, and we implemented every single one of them.”

And if Hillary does become president? “First, I would have to assess what she wants me to do,” he says. “And second, we might have to change the [foundation] rules again. But we haven’t talked about that yet, and I don’t think we should. You can’t. It’s hard for any party to hang on to the White House for 12 years, and it’s a long road. A thousand things could happen.”

Embedded in every word President Clinton says is the belief in commercial partnerships to get things done for public use and community reclamation. To bring back Haiti tourism will have to be re-envisioned, which will take hotels willing to be partners, as well as an infrastructure that remains non-existent.

2016?

It’s a whole new political landscape and Bill Clinton won’t be on the bleachers or sparring with reporters until it gets down to one Democrat, HRC, and whomever the poor, unlucky bastard will be running against the Clinton Democrats who will pull out every GOTV and electoral magic trick to elect the first woman president in history.

New York magazine’s Jason Zengerle will be just one of the establishment media boys, reporters who find covering Clinton “a drag,” who’re going to find out that Hillary Clinton’s candidacy is the very definition of “trailblazing.”

While it seems basic, the fresh crop of advisers cringe at how she announced her last presidential campaign, with a video message and a statement on her website that declared: “I’m in. And I’m in to win.” This first-person mantra, which flourished repeatedly throughout her statement back on Jan. 20, 2007, will be all but stripped from her vocabulary, aides say. In its place will be a pledge to carry the causes of Americans who feel left behind in the economic recovery and the growing divide among classes.

[Sneak peek inside Hillary Clinton 2016, CNN]