Bill Cosby allegations of sexual assault stirring yet again, as he refused to deal with the charges that have been around for years.

Bill Cosby allegations of sexual assault stirring yet again, as he refused to deal with the charges that have been around for years.

GIF via Gawker

In 2004, when Andrea Constand filed a lawsuit against Bill Cosby for sexual assault, her lawyers asked me to testify. Cosby had drugged and raped me, too, I told them. The lawyers said I could testify anonymously as a Jane Doe, but I ardently rejected that idea. My name is not Jane Doe. My name is Barbara Bowman, and I wanted to tell my story in court. In the end, I didn’t have the opportunity to do that, because Cosby settled the suit for an undisclosed amount of money. [Washington Post]

DURING AN interview on NPR’s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon, Bill Cosby refused to answer questions he is once again facing, as renewed scrutiny arises over a history of allegations the star has faced over charges of sexual assault and rape. The Washington Post piece excerpted above turned into a nightmare for Cosby this past week, the resurfacing of these charges causing him to cancel appearances with Queen Latifa, as well as David Letterman‘s show.

The furor forced Bill Cosby to finally release a statement through his attorney.

The NPR interview is below (h/t HuffPost), with the main moment at around 3:28.

Bill Cosby’s silence during his NPR interview came after the star dared Twitter to “Go ahead, meme me.” The request ricocheted across the social media platform.

Bill Cosby "Go ahead, meme me," backfires big time!

Bill Cosby “Go ahead, meme me,” backfires big time!

Bill Cosby "Go ahead, meme me," backfires big time!

Bill Cosby “Go ahead, meme me,” backfires big time!

Bill Cosby "Go ahead, meme me," backfires big time!

Bill Cosby “Go ahead, meme me,” backfires big time!

Bill Cosby "Go ahead, meme me," backfires big time!

Bill Cosby “Go ahead, meme me,” backfires big time!

Men, show business and sexual intimidation of all varieties, including sexual assault, rape and even murder, have been a feature of the entertainment business since its founding. I’d regale you with my own experiences, which range from groping to kissing to quid pro quo opportunities, to “giving me what I wanted” (twice, before I knew what hit me) when I showed up at a dancing instructor’s door, but they’re only garden variety sexual harassment (and stupidity), which pales in comparison to the charges being lobbed against Bill Cosby.

Fatty Arbuckle became infamous because of it. In the lesser crimes division, look at what Arnold Schwarzenegger got away with, only to end up humiliating his wife Maria Shriver by bedding their nanny, which resulted in a child! Having lived in Los Angeles for almost 20 years, there wasn’t woman in the business who didn’t know all about the serial allegations that never seemed to deflate the megastar.

We just learned of the damning horrors of what Stephen Collins is alleged to have done to a young girl.

There’s now a documentary about Bryan Singer, X-Men director, and allegations of drugging and raping a young boy.

That all Bill Cosby has to offer is silence to pointed questions demanding he answer 10 years of charges by multiple women shouldn’t surprise anyone given the history of show business, which is a rough industry that I traversed from New York to Los Angeles and everywhere in between.

What does Bill Cosby have to gain by facing the allegations surround his past behavior?

If only Joe Paterno could speak to us from beyond. Someone who didn’t commit the crimes, but instead stood around and covered up what was happening, looking the other way and leaving the victims to twist in their pain. It’s a cultural mindset that has pervaded our society, no matter the industry, since men founded our country.