ISIS strategy, a mess or working? President Barack Obama meets with senior military leadership at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., Oct. 8, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

ISIS strategy, a mess or working?

President Barack Obama meets with senior military leadership at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., Oct. 8, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Turkish warplanes were reported to have attacked Kurdish rebel targets in southeast Turkey after the army said it had been attacked by the banned PKK Kurdish militant group, risking reigniting a three-decade conflict that killed 40,000 people before a cease-fire was declared two years ago. [Reuters]

WHAT A mess. To give you an idea of just how bad it’s gotten, President Obama has lost Eugene Robinson.

It’s not too soon to state the obvious: At this point, the war against the Islamic State can be seen only as failing.

U.S.-led air power has barely been able to keep the jihadist militants from capturing the Syrian town of Kobane, near the Turkish border — and the besieged city may yet fall. Far to the southeast, Islamic State fighters have come within a few miles of Baghdad and threaten to consolidate their control of the vast Anbar Province, the Sunni heartland of Iraq. The self-proclaimed “caliphate” remains intact, and its forces are advancing.

How anyone can tell if the Administration policy is “failing” is curious. What can be said is that it makes no sense from the outside and Obama’s team isn’t helping anyone understand what they’re doing.

There is no evidence to give Americans hope, especially compared to the non-stop reports out of the region that ISIS continues to advance, while U.S. airstrikes and “coalition” forces continue to follow the terrorist group across the Middle East.

From CNN:

Another U.S. strike near the Syrian city of Dayr az Zawr struck a modular oil refinery and initial indications are that this strike was successful.

The strikes are meant to prevent the extremist Muslim group from resupplying and massing combat power on the Kurdish held portions of Kobani, Central Command said in a release.

All coalition aircraft used in missions against ISIS departed the space safely, the military said, and analysis of the strikes suggests that they slowed ISIS’ advance.

But Central Command warned that “the security situation on the ground there remains fluid” with ISIS attempting to gain territory and beat back the Kurdish military, which is putting up a fierce fight.

Turkey’s role against ISIS, versus their own domestic obsession with the Kurds, leaves President Obama in a very difficult position. If the Turks aren’t going to be part of the solutions, which depends on the Kurds, they’re clearly playing a role as part of the problem.