Senator Marco Rubio learned from the immigration battle that if you want to seduce the Republican right you have to put intelligence and science aside.

Senator Marco Rubio learned from the immigration battle that if you want to seduce the Republican right you have to put intelligence and science aside.

“But I do believe that the fact is, that these events that we’re talking about are impacting us, because we’ve built very expensive structures in Florida and other parts of the country near areas that are prone to hurricanes. We’ve had hurricanes in Florida forever.”Senator Marco Rubio

STEPPING OUT on immigration reform, then getting clobbered by the Republican right, has taken whatever soul Senator Marco Rubio once had and crushed it. In an interview with ABC’s Jonathan Karl, Senator Rubio made what can only be seen as a nakedly ambitious attempt to make a pitch to the base, who won’t nominate anyone who believes in climate change.

Today’s Republican base brings their own facts to the discussion, not just their ideological opinions, and you can bet none of them have perused the new National Climate Assessment I covered last week or educated themselves on the real dangers of extreme weather.

“The question is what “” who’s vision is the one that our party wants to follow?” – Senator Marco Rubio

Senator Marco Rubio has the ambition and 14 years of government experience, but what he doesn’t have is a core. What he learned from standing up once upon a time on immigration reform is that if you want to be the Republican nominee for president you can’t afford one.

If Republican Rep. Michael Grimm hadn’t been indicted on 20 counts he could have introduced Marco Rubio to a widow who watched her daughter get swept away by thunderous waves from hurricane Sandy, losing her husband, too. The scene is recounted in Showtime’s Years of Living Dangerously, with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes narrating.

Excerpts from Senator Marco Rubio’s comments to ABC’s Jonathan Karl below. It’s a reminder how far the Republican Party has fallen since Richard M. Nixon created the E.P.A., when science was important to Republicans.

“I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it “¦ and I do not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it, except it will destroy our economy…”

“The fact is that these events that we’re talking about are impacting us, because we built very expensive structures in Florida and other parts of the country near areas that are prone to hurricanes. We’ve had hurricanes in Florida forever. and the question is, what do we do about the fact that we have built expensive structures, real estate and population centers, near those vulnerable areas?” he asked. “I have no problem with taking mitigation activity.

… Yeah, I “” I don’t agree with the notion that some are putting out there, including scientists, that somehow, there are actions we can take today that would actually have an impact on what’s happening in our climate. Our climate is always changing. And what they have chosen to do is take a handful of decades of research and “” and say that this is now evidence of a longer-term trend that’s directly and almost solely attributable to manmade activity”¦

[...] I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it.

That’s what I do not. And I do not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it, except it will destroy our economy.