Via Think Progress:

With Thursday’s ruling that a Texas voter identification law violates the Voting Rights Act, a pattern continues to emerge of Republican legislatures and governors attempting to enact illegal voter suppression legislation and courts striking them down. Among the recently rejected laws are strict voter identification laws, provisional voting restrictions, limits on voter registration drives, and reduced availability for early voting.

Read more about today’s ruling in the Associated Press report. The federal court rejected the requirement of a photo ID before being able to vote.

A three-judge panel in Washington unanimously ruled that the law imposes “˜strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor’ and noted that racial minorities in Texas are more likely to live in poverty.

This most likely means the law cannot go into effect for November elections, though Greg Abbot, Texas state Attorney General, said he would appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Think Progress piece includes a “partial roundup” of recently court decisions.

Among the recently rejected laws are strict voter identification laws, provisional voting restrictions, limits on voter registration drives, and reduced availability for early voting.

In addition to today’s ruling about the Texas voter ID law, a federal judge blocked a Florida law in May. On Monday of this week, another federal judge granted an injunction to block an Ohio law. In July, a state circuit court judge blocked a law in Wisconsin. And a federal court in South Carolina is currently considering a voter ID law. The Think Progress report provides details about each case.

For some analysis, see David Dayen’s post today at FDL.

(Photo via Photobucket)